25 LGBTQ+ Pride Flags & Their Meanings (2024)

A series of multiple LGBTQ+ Pride Flags, including the Trans Pride Flag, Intersex Progress Pride Flag, Pansexual Pride Flag, and more

It doesn’t need to be Pride Month to see lots of different pride flags waving brightly in the wind celebrating the diverse range of identities and experiences among the LGBTQ+ community

While most of us are well aware of the significance of the rainbow symbols that grace the skies, there are actually a lot more pride flags than you might realize! 

These banners might represent that somewhere is a safe, affirming space for a specific group of people; that someone is celebrating their identity (or the identity of a loved one); or might even be an emblem of resistance against homophobia or transphobia. 

These flags represent feelings of power, belonging, comfort, and safety; wrapping LGBTQ+ folks in the pride and joy of community. So, it’s important to know what these flags mean, how you might want to use them, and how to respect them during Pride and beyond. 

Let’s get to it!

By the way, we’ve also included some links to be able to buy these flags — and some of the links may include affiliate links, which means we may earn a commission at no extra cost to you. 

We’ve provided links to Flags For Good, which donates a portion of each Pride flag sale to LGBTQ+ nonprofits and has a fully carbon neutral production and distribution process. Use our links to save 10% off your entire order.

(We’ve also included links to Amazon for accessibility purposes.)

Everything in this article was independently and honestly written by the Good Good Good team. 

Every LGBTQ+ Pride Flag & Their Meaning

Gilbert Baker Pride Flag

Designed by Gilbert Baker in 1978, the “original” Pride Flag offers a distinct symbol for the LGBTQ+ community to represent and celebrate their diverse identities. 

The flag originally included eight colors, each capturing a different element of the LGBTQ+ experience and the importance of unity within the community. Two colors were later removed — hot pink and turquoise — for price and practicality reasons. 

Original Gilbert Baker Pride Flag with horizontal pink, red, orange, yellow, green, turquoise, indigo, violet stripes

Designer: Gilbert Baker

Created: 1978

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Hot Pink: Sexuality
  • Red: Life
  • Orange: Healing
  • Yellow: Sunlight
  • Green: Nature
  • Turquoise: Magic and art
  • Indigo: Serenity and harmony
  • Violet: Spirit

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Gilbert Baker Pride Flag

6-Color Rainbow Pride Flag

Designed by Gilbert Baker in 1978, the 6-Color Pride Flag, or Rainbow Flag, is the subsequent rendition of his original design with two fewer colors, again, for the sake of price and practicality. 

While the Rainbow Pride Flag is still widely used as an overarching rainbow symbol for the community as a whole, there are a variety of newer iterations from other designers that are considered to be more inclusive.

6-Color Rainbow Pride Flag with horizontal red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple stripes

Designer: Gilbert Baker

Created: 1978

Colors & Meanings:

  • Red: Life
  • Orange: Healing
  • Yellow: Sunlight
  • Green: Nature
  • Blue: Serenity and harmony
  • Purple: Spirit

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Rainbow Pride Flag

Progress Pride Flag

Born from a desire to create a more inclusive symbol, the Progress Pride Flag emerged in 2018, designed by non-binary artist Daniel Quasar

This flag harmoniously blends the iconic rainbow flag with the colors of the Transgender Pride Flag and additional stripes representing LGBTQ+ communities of color. 

The flag serves as a reminder of the ongoing journey toward greater unity, love, and acceptance, while still recognizing the importance of continuing the fight for equal rights across diverse intersections of the LGBTQ+ community.

“The trans flag stripes and marginalized community stripes were shifted to the Hoist of the flag and given a new chevron shape,” Quasar outlines on their website. “The arrow points to the right to show forward movement, while being along the hoist edge shows that progress still needs to be made.”

Many people, businesses, and organizations have swapped their original Rainbow Pride Flags for the Progress Pride Flag in recent years, as an effort to symbolize further inclusion across the wide spectrum of identities and experiences of the queer community.

Progress Pride flag, which includes an arrow that includes pink, blue, brown, and black

Designer: Daniel Quasar

Created: 2018

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black and Brown: Representing LGBTQ+ people of color, acknowledging their experiences, contributions, and struggles within the community.
  • Light Blue and Pink: Derived from the Transgender Pride Flag, representing trans individuals; light blue symbolizes trans men and boys, and pink symbolizes trans women and girls.
  • Red: Life
  • Orange: Healing
  • Yellow: Sunlight
  • Green: Nature
  • Blue: Serenity and harmony
  • Purple: Spirit

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Progress Pride Flag

Philadelphia More Color More Pride Flag

In 2017, the city of Philadelphia took part in a citywide “More Color More Pride” campaign and created its own new Pride flag. A take on the traditional six-color Rainbow Pride Flag, the design added two new stripes to represent LGBTQ+ people of color.

The flag was designed with the intention to call for change and demand inclusion for both LGBTQ+ and BIPOC communities in Philadelphia. The flag has since been adapted, similarly to the Progress Pride Flag, as a symbol of increased inclusion and diversity. 

Philadelphia More Color More Pride Flag which includes a brown stripe and a black stripe above the standard rainbow pride flag

Designer: Philadelphia’s Office of LGBT Affairs and design agency Tierney

Created: 2017

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black and Brown: Representing LGBTQ+ people of color, acknowledging their experiences, contributions, and struggles within the community
  • Red: Life
  • Orange: Healing
  • Yellow: Sunlight
  • Green: Nature
  • Blue: Serenity and harmony
  • Purple: Spirit

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Philadelphia Pride Flag

Queer Pride Flag

Lesser known than other rainbow flags, the Queer Pride Flag represents every aspect of queerness — especially as the “queer” label becomes more widely used and celebrated. 

Although the origins of its design are not entirely known, the Queer Pride Flag emerged in 2015.

Queer Pride Flag

Designer: Unknown

Created: 2015

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black: Represents the asexual, aromantic, and agender communities
  • Blue: Represents same-gender attraction
  • Green: Represents non-binary and gender nonconforming individuals
  • White: Represents the asexual, aromantic, and agender communities
  • Orange: Represents non-binary and gender nonconforming individuals
  • Pink: Represents same-gender attraction

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Queer Pride Flag

Lesbian Flag

With its striking array of warm colors, the Lesbian Flag, designed by Emily Gwen in 2018, beautifully captures the spirit of the lesbian community. 

From shades of orange to pink, the flag conveys the diversity, of lesbian experiences, while pointing to values of love, visibility, and advocacy within the community. 

Lesbian Pride Flag

Designer: Emily Gwen

Created: 2018

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Dark Orange: Gender nonconformity
  • Orange: Independence
  • Light Orange: Community
  • Pink: Unique relationship to womanhood
  • Dusty Pink: Serenity and peace
  • White: Solidarity with other marginalized LGBTQ+ communities

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Lesbian Pride Flag

Trans-Inclusive Gay Men’s Pride Flag

The Trans-Inclusive Gay Men’s Pride Flag — sometimes called the Men-Loving-Men Pride Flag, is a newer iteration of the Pride Flag, assumed to have been designed in 2017 by Tumblr user @gayflagblog. While cisgender, white gay men have long been at the center of gay rights movements, once the Rainbow and Progress Pride Flags became more umbrella symbols for the community as a whole, demand grew for a more specific flag for men who love men. 

It started off as a five-colored flag and later became designed with seven colors to include a broader spectrum of LGBTQ+ men. 

Trans Inclusive Gay Men's Pride Flag

Designer: Tumblr user @gayflagblog 

Created: 2017

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Dark Green: Community
  • Teal: Healing
  • Light Green: Joy
  • White: Gender-nonconforming, non-binary, and transgender men
  • Blue: Pure love
  • Purple: Fortitude 
  • Indigo: Diversity

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Gay Men’s Pride Flag

Bisexual Flag

The Bisexual Pride Flag was designed in 1998 by Michael Page to celebrate the bisexual community within the LGBTQ+ spectrum.

The flag’s three stripes signify the diverse range of attractions experienced by bisexual individuals, with the outer colors representing attraction to the same and different genders, and the middle color representing attraction across the gender spectrum. 

Bisexual Pride Flag

Designer: Michael Page

Created: 1998

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Magenta: Represents attraction to the same gender
  • Lavender: Represents attraction across the gender spectrum, as a mix of magenta and royal blue
  • Royal Blue: Represents attraction to a different gender

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Bisexual Pride Flag

Transgender Flag

Created by trans woman Monica Helms in 1999, the Transgender Pride Flag was designed to provide the transgender community with a distinct symbol to represent and celebrate their unique identities within the LGBTQ+ community. 

The flag’s five stripes include the traditional colors for baby boys and girls, while the central white stripe acknowledges those who are transitioning, non-binary, or identify outside the gender binary. 

Trans Pride Flag

Designer: Monica Helms

Created: 1999

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Light Blue: Represents the traditional color for baby boys, symbolizing trans men and boys
  • Light Pink: Represents the traditional color for baby girls, symbolizing trans women and girls
  • White: Represents those who are transitioning, non-binary, or identify outside the gender binary

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Transgender Pride Flag

Nonbinary Flag

Created and shared on Tumblr by Kye Rowan in 2014, the Nonbinary Pride Flag provides a distinct symbol for nonbinary individuals.

The flag’s four colors capture the wide range of nonbinary experiences, including gender outside the binary, a mix of multiple genders, the absence of gender, and the community’s interconnectedness. 

Nonbinary Pride Flag

Designer: Kye Rowan

Created: 2014

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Yellow: Represents those who identify outside the traditional gender binary
  • White: Represents those who identify with a mix of multiple genders
  • Purple: Represents those who identify without any gender (agender)
  • Black: Represents the interconnectedness of all nonbinary individuals within the community

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Nonbinary Pride Flag

Intersex Flag

The Intersex Pride Flag was designed by Morgan Carpenter in 2013 to create a unique symbol for the intersex community that was not based on traditional gender symbols. 

The flag features a purple circle on a yellow background, representing wholeness and inclusivity, as well as the unique and diverse experiences of intersex individuals. 

“There is no commonly understood symbol or flag, even within intersex communities. Many attempts have seemed derivative, of a rainbow flag, of gender stereotypes, gendered pink and blue colors, of transgender symbols, or an infinity symbol used by some bisexual groups,” Carpenter wrote about the design

“This is one attempt to create something that is not derivative, but yet is firmly grounded in meaning.”

The flag serves as a powerful reminder of the importance of visibility, recognition, and advocacy for the intersex community, emphasizing their resilience and ongoing fight for bodily autonomy and human rights.

Intersex Pride Flag

Designer: Morgan Carpenter of Intersex Human Rights Australia

Created: 2013

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Yellow: Represents visibility and the need for recognition of the intersex community
  • Purple Circle: Symbolizes wholeness, inclusivity, and the diverse experiences of intersex individuals

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Intersex Pride Flag

Asexual Flag

The Asexual Pride Flag was designed in 2010 by the Asexuality Visibility and Education Network (AVEN) to represent the diverse identities within the asexual community, each color symbolizing a specific aspect of asexuality.

The flag’s four stripes represent a range of asexual experiences, including asexuality, demisexuality, graysexuality, and their connection within the community.

Asexual Pride Flag, with horizontal Black, Gray, White, and Purple stripes

Designer: Asexuality Visibility and Education Network (AVEN)

Created: 2010

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black: Represents asexuality
  • Gray: Represents graysexuality (people who experience sexual attraction rarely or under specific circumstances)
  • White: Represents demisexuality (people who only experience sexual attraction after forming a deep emotional connection)
  • Purple: Represents the importance of community and solidarity among asexual individuals

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Asexual Pride Flag

Pansexual Flag

The Pansexual Pride Flag is believed to have been designed by an anonymous Tumblr user and began appearing online in 2010. It has since grown in prominence around the world.

The flag’s three stripes represent the diverse range of attractions experienced by pansexual individuals, encompassing attraction to all genders or regardless of gender. 

Pansexual Pride flag

Designer: Jasper V., an anonymous Tumblr user

Created: 2010

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Magenta: Represents attraction to the same gender (or attraction to those who identify as female)
  • Yellow: Represents attraction to genders outside the traditional binary
  • Blue or Cyan: Represents attraction to a different gender (or attraction to those who identify as male)

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Pansexual Pride Flag

Abrosexual Flag

Posted anonymously on DeviantArt as early as in 2013, the Abrosexual Pride Flag offers a distinct symbol for those whose sexuality is fluid and fluctuates between different sexualities.

The flag’s five colors capture the fluid nature of abrosexual experiences, reflecting the changing attractions and orientations that individuals may experience over time. 

Abrosexual Pride Flag with green, white, and pink stripes

Designer: Unknown

Created: 2016

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Green: Represents attraction to all genders
  • White: Represents the in-between fluidity of attraction
  • Pink: Represents attraction to the same gender

Get a Flag: Amazon

Drag Pride Flag

Designed by Veranda L’Ni for the Austin International Drag Foundation in 2016, the Drag Pride Flag offers a distinct symbol for drag performers.

The flag’s colors are purple, white, and blue and includes a crown and stars in the center.

Drag Pride Flag with vertical purple, white, and blue stripes — with a pink star-tipped crown in the center

Designer: Veranda L’Ni

Created: 2016

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Purple: Represents the passion for drag performers all share
  • White: Represents the blank slate that is a performer’s body and face to create the characters they become
  • Blue: Represents self-expression and loyalty
  • Crown: Represents leadership in the community
  • Stars: Represent the many different forms of drag

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Drag Pride Flag

Genderqueer Pride Flag

Designed by Marilyn Roxie in 2011, the Genderqueer Pride Flag offers a distinct symbol for the genderqueer community while taking aesthetic inspiration from lesbian, bisexual, and pansexual flags, utilizing horizontal bars of color with special meanings.. 

The flag’s three colors — lavender, white, and green — capture the wide range of genderqueer experiences and provide visibility and interconnectedness in the genderqueer community.

Genderqueer Pride Flag

Designer: Marilyn Roxie

Created: 2011

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Lavender: Represents androgyny, as well as the combination of both masculine and feminine characteristics
  • White: Represents those who identify as agender or genderless, having no gender or a neutral gender
  • Green: Represents those who identify as non-binary or outside the traditional gender binary, symbolizing growth and renewal

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Genderqueer Pride Flag

Two-Spirit Flag

Designed by anonymous Tumblr user 2Sanon in 2016, the Two-Spirit Pride Flag combines symbols of both Indigenous and LGBTQ+ communities.

The two feathers signify masculine and feminine energies, while the circle indicates oneness. The symbol is usually placed atop a Rainbow Pride Flag, but it can also be seen over transgender, nonbinary, or Progress flags.

Two-Spirit Flag: a rainbow flag with a feather design in the center

Designer: 2Sanon on Tumblr

Created: 2016

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Rainbow: Represents the connectedness of two-spirit individuals within the broader LGBTQ+ community 
  • Two Feathers: Symbolize the blending of masculine and feminine spirits, as well as the spiritual nature of two-spirit individuals within their Indigenous communities

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Two-Spirit Pride Flag

Genderfluid Pride Flag

The Genderfluid Pride Flag was designed in 2012 by JJ Poole to create representation for those whose gender identity and/or gender expression fluctuates throughout life.

The flag’s five stripes represent the diversity and fluidity of genderfluid experiences, with individuals transitioning between different gender identities over time.

Genderfluid Pride Flag

Designer: JJ Poole

Created: 2012

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Pink: Represents femininity and the fluidity experienced by those who identify as female at times
  • White: Represents the lack of gender, as well as the fluidity experienced by those who identify as agender or genderless at times
  • Purple: Represents both masculinity and femininity, as well as the fluidity experienced by those who identify as both or a mix of male and female at times
  • Black: Represents all genders, as well as the fluidity experienced by those who identify as all or multiple genders at times
  • Blue: Represents masculinity and the fluidity experienced by those who identify as male at times

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Genderfluid Pride Flag

Agender Pride Flag

Designed by Salem X in 2014, the Agender Pride Flag offers those who identify as agender — which means not identifying with any particular gender — a symbol to feel more connected and affirmed in their sense of self. 

The flag’s seven colors capture the essence of gender absence or neutrality, reflecting the experiences of individuals who do not identify within the gender binary. 

Agender Pride Flag

Designer: Salem X 

Created: 2014

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black: Represents the absence of gender, as well as the resilience and strength of the agender community
  • Gray: Symbolizes partial gender, as well as the fluidity experienced by those who identify as partially gendered or gender-neutral
  • White: Represents gender neutrality and the experience of identifying as neither male nor female
  • Green: Symbolizes non-binary gender identities, emphasizing the importance of inclusivity and acceptance within the LGBTQ+ community

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Agender Pride Flag

Intersex-Inclusive Progress Pride Flag

The Intersex-Inclusive “Progress” Pride Flag was designed in 2021 by Valentino Vecchietti, an intersex activist, to create a more inclusive symbol within the LGBTQ+ community. 

This flag incorporates elements of the original Progress Pride Flag, designed by Daniel Quasar in 2018, and adds a circle with the intersex flag colors to represent intersex individuals. 

Intersex-Inclusive Progress Pride Flag, with a purple circle on a yellow background on a Progress Pride Flag

Designer: Valentino Vecchietti of Intersex Equality Rights UK

Created: 2021

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black and Brown: Representing LGBTQ+ people of color, acknowledging their experiences, contributions, and struggles within the community
  • Light Blue and Pink: Derived from the Transgender Pride Flag, representing trans individuals; light blue symbolizes trans men and boys, and pink symbolizes trans women and girls
  • Intersex Circle: Yellow circle with purple circle inside, representing intersex individuals and their unique experiences
  • Red: Life
  • Orange: Healing
  • Yellow: Sunlight
  • Green: Nature
  • Blue: Serenity and harmony
  • Purple: Spirit

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

Polysexual Pride Flag

The Polysexual Pride Flag was designed in 2012 by an anonymous Tumblr user to create a unique symbol for the polysexual community within the LGBTQ+ spectrum. 

The flag’s three stripes represent attraction to multiple, but not all, genders, emphasizing the diverse range of gender identities that polysexual individuals may be attracted to. 

Polysexual Pride Flag with horizontal pink, green, and blue stripes

Designer: Anonymous Tumblr user

Created: 2012

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Pink: Represents attraction to female-identified or feminine individuals
  • Green: Represents attraction to non-binary, genderqueer, or gender nonconforming individuals
  • Blue: Represents attraction to male-identified or masculine individuals

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Polysexual Pride Flag

Demisexual Pride Flag

The Demisexual Pride Flag was designed in 2010 by an anonymous user on the Asexuality Visibility and Education Network (AVEN) to create a symbol representative of demisexual folks; those who only develop sexual attraction after forming a deep emotional connection with another person. 

The flag’s four colors represent the unique experience of demisexual individuals and take inspiration from the Asexual Pride Flag design, implementing white, purple, and gray bars with a black triangle on the left-hand side.

Demisexual Pride Flag

Designer: Anonymous AVEN user

Created: 2010

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Black: Represents asexuality, acknowledging the spectrum of asexual identities
  • White: Represents sexuality, symbolizing the spectrum of sexual identities
  • Purple: Represents community, highlighting the importance of connections and support within the LGBTQ+ community
  • Gray: Represents the unique experiences of demisexual individuals, who only experience sexual attraction after forming a deep emotional connection

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Demisexual Pride Flag

Aromantic Pride Flag

The Aromantic Pride Flag was designed in 2014 by Tumblr user @cameronwhimsy to create a unique symbol for the aromantic community within the LGBTQ+ spectrum. 

The flag’s five stripes represent the unique experience of aromantic individuals, who do not experience romantic attraction to others. 

Aromantic Pride Flag

Designer: Tumblr user @cameronwhimsy

Created: 2014

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Green: Represents aromanticism
  • Light Green: Represents the aromantic spectrum
  • White: Represents friendship and platonic love, as well as queer platonic relationships
  • Gray: Represents gray-aromantic individuals, who may experience romantic attraction in limited or specific circumstances
  • Black: Represents the broader spectrum of romantic and sexual orientations, acknowledging the diversity of identities within the LGBTQ+ community

Get a Flag: Flags For Good | Amazon

→ Learn more about the Aromantic Pride Flag

Demigender Pride Flag

Designed by an anonymous Tumblr user in 2014, the Demigender Pride Flag represents those who partially identify with a specific gender or genders. 

The flag’s three colors capture the essence of demigender experiences, reflecting the wide variety of gender identities.

Demigender Pride Flag

Designer: Anonymous Tumblr user

Created: 2014

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Yellow: Represents non-binary and genderqueer individuals, acknowledging the spectrum of non-binary and genderqueer identities
  • White: Represents the experience of partial identification with a specific gender, symbolizing the spectrum of demigender identities
  • Gray: Represents the absence of gender, symbolizing the spectrum of agender identities and the diversity of demigender experiences

Get a Flag: Amazon

→ Learn more about the Demigender Pride Flag

Androgyne Pride Flag

The Androgyne Pride Flag was designed in 2014 by an anonymous Tumblr user.

The flag’s three vertical stripes represent the unique experience of androgynous individuals, who express or identify with both masculine and feminine characteristics. 

Androgyne Pride Flag

Designer: Anonymous Tumblr user

Created: 2014

Colors & Meanings: 

  • Pink: Represents femininity, acknowledging the spectrum of female-identified and feminine-presenting individuals
  • Purple: Represents androgyny as a combination of the two colors
  • Blue: Represents masculinity, acknowledging the spectrum of male-identified and masculine-presenting individuals

Get a Flag: Amazon

→ Learn more about the Androgyne Pride Flag

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the 5 main pride flags?

Every Pride flag is important to the communities that they represent, but there are some Pride flags that are more commonly displayed. According to Michael Green, the founder of Flags For Good, the five most popular Pride flags in 2023 were:

  1. Progress Pride Flag
  2. Intersex Progress Pride Flag
  3. Trans Pride Flag
  4. 6-Stripe Rainbow Pride Flag
  5. Bisexual Pride Flag

Where can I buy LGBTQ+ Pride flags?

You can buy LGBTQ+ Pride flags from various outlets, including Amazon, eBay, and Etsy. Flags For Good is an especially noteworthy source that not only sells diverse Pride flags but also contributes part of its earnings to LGBTQ+ causes. 

How many Pride flags are there?

It’s hard to pinpoint an exact count of Pride flags because the LGBTQ+ spectrum is vast and constantly developing. However, there are more than 30 distinct flags that symbolize the various identities, orientations, and intersections included in this community.

What are the different LGBTQ+ holidays, weeks, and months?

Various holidays, weeks, and months are celebrated in the LGBTQ+ community. These include Pride Month in June, LGBTQ+ History Month in October, Transgender Day of Visibility in March, and the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia in May, plus National Coming Out Day in October

Explore our complete guide to LGBTQ+ awareness days and pride months

What are the different LGBTQ+ awareness ribbon meanings?

In the LGBTQ+ community, different awareness ribbons hold unique meanings. The rainbow ribbon signifies LGBTQ+ pride, the lavender ribbon is for queer awareness, the pink, blue, and white ribbon symbolizes transgender pride, and the red ribbon is universally recognized as a symbol for AIDS awareness.

Explore our complete guide to awareness ribbon colors and meanings

Why is pink not in the Pride flag?

The original Pride flag, designed by Gilbert Baker, did include pink. However, due to production difficulties and the unavailability of hot pink fabric at the time, the pink stripe was removed, resulting in the commonly seen six-color version of the flag. 

Where is the original Pride flag?

The original Pride flag, created by Gilbert Baker in 1978, does not exist in its entirety today. However, a fragment of it is housed at the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco. In honor of the 20th anniversary of the flag’s creation in 1998, Baker recreated his eight-color design using identical methods.

What are some rainbow Pride flag books?

A: Some notable books about the rainbow Pride flag include “Pride: An Inspirational History of the LGBTQ+ Movement” by Stella Caldwell, “Pride Colors” by Robin Stevenson, “Rainbow: A First Book of Pride” by Michael Genhart and Anne Passchier, and “LGBTQ+ Pride Flags: and What They All Mean” by Matt Haslam.

Explore our curated guide to rainbow Pride flag books

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